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Community Resources

Caregiving Glossary

Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Coping with Challenging Behaviors

Legal topics to consider

End of Life

Housing

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255

Crisis Call Center

Compassionate assistance to people in any type of crisis

775-784-8090 or 1-800-273-8255

Friendship Line

A crisis hotline and a warmline for non-urgent calls. This line provides support services such as:

  • Suicide prevention
  • Emotional support
  • Elder abuse prevention and therapy
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support
  • Information and referrals for older adults or adults with disabilities

1-800-971-0016

Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 Support Line

1-800-272-3900

The 2-1-1 program is a free, private service to help find local resources, including:

  • Food and nutrition programs
  • Shelter and housing resources
  • Utilities support
  • Disaster relief
  • Employment
  • Addiction prevention and rehabilitation programs
  • Reentry support for ex-offenders
  • Support groups
  • Safe help out an abusive situation

Call 2-1-1 to speak with a service expert in your area.

Caring for someone is rarely easy, and can be overwhelming. In order to care for a loved one successfully, caregivers must make time to care for themselves. Remember the facts and tips below in order to help you take care of yourself.

  • No one can be perfect. As a caregiver, you will make mistakes from which you can learn.
  • Many emotions will surface when you take on the job of caregiving.
  • Depression is a common experience while caregiving.
  • Give yourself and your loved one realistic expectations.
  • Use the education and resources available to you.
  • Understand the skills required to care for your loved one, and be honest about which ones you are not able to perform.
  • Learn to say “no” to anything you cannot do.
  • Accept help from others.
  • Be resilient.
  • Identify your own stressors.
  • Identify how you cope with stress.
  • Remember the following tips for successful coping:
    • Eat right
    • Exercise
    • Sleep

Most people need emotional support during their time as caregivers. Support can help set boundaries, improve communication, and boost coping skills.

Support groups: